House votes to curb US involvement in Saudi led-Yemen war

The U.S. House of Representatives overwhelmingly approved (On July 14) two amendments to the National Defense Authorization Act [NDAA] that would prohibit U.S. participation in the catastrophic Saudi-UAE war against the Houthi-Saleh alliance in Yemen.

The Davidson [R-OH] amendment prohibits U.S. military action in Yemen not authorized by the 2001 AUMF. U.S. participation in the Saudi-UAE war in Yemen is not targeting Al Qaeda or ISIS and is not authorized by the 2001 AUMF. 

Another amendment, the Nolan [D-MN] amendment prohibits the deployment of U.S. troops to participation in Yemen’s civil war. Nolan’s amendment would also block the U.S. refueling of Saudi and UAE warplanes bombing Yemen.

But these would not necessarily force the Donald Trump administration to stop their support for Saudi Arabia in the Yemen war against the Houtis-Salleh group.

The Houtis-Salleh group are supported by Iran, and the Saudis are saying Qatar is also a main sponsor of the anti-Sunni rebels in Yemen.

The Saudis are blamed for the outbreak of Cholera in Yemen, saying its war has forced the UN to suspend its vaccination plans against the decease in the war-torn country.

But the Trump administration does not see things entirely this way.

Anti-Saudi lobby in Washington are saying the war has also strengthened Al Qaeda and ISIS but they fail to state that it has opened the door to Iran within the Saudi frontier with Yemen, sparking Shia rioting inside Saudi Arabian territory.

Accusations are also made that the Al Qaeda’s Yemen branch is allied with the Saudis and the UAE against the Houthi-Saleh forces, though the US is still attacking the Al-Qaeda branch in Yemen with drones.

A Democratic Senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut has said: “The Saudis simply could not operate this bombing campaign without us. Their planes can’t fly without U.S. refueling capacity.” Yet the U.S. has doubled the amount of fuel it provided to Saudi and UAE bombers since October. Most of the bombers refueled by the U.S. are UAE bombers, according to the Pentagon. The Pentagon apparently has little oversight or concern about who or what it is helping to bomb.”

 Nevertheless, CENTCOM spokesperson Maj. Josh Jacques said: 

“We provide refueling totals for the Saudi-led Coalition on an on-demand basis,” said CENTCOM 

“They request refueling and we provide it. I will refer you to the Saudi-led coalition as to the reasons why they requested the amounts of fuel.”

Photo credit: Sputnik International

Post Author: admin

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *